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24 September 2002 @ 10:54 pm
My mom saw my journal today  
And she commented on how odd it was to see me quoting from a book she had read before I was born. This reminded me of how I found it in the first place.

The house I grew up in had an attic, where we stored Christmas decorations. When I was helping my parents put away the decorations, I saw several boxes other than the ones we usually grabbed. Me being the curious child that I was, I eventually went up there when nobody else was home, just so I could check the contents of every single box.

One box was full of books. By this point in my life, I had already read most of the books that "seemed interesting" from my parent's shelves, including such things as "Podkayne of Mars" and "The Notebooks of Lazarus Long". I had read the cronicles of Narnia and Frank Herbert's stories of Norby. I don't know why these books in particular where set aside; perhaps they just ran out of shelf space and these were books that my parents weren't interested in rereading anytime soon. Perhaps my parents were trying to protect an inquisitive child from more adult ideas, since they knew I would read just about anything I could get my hands on.

Gradually, I migrated books from that box to my own shelves. I found "I Will Fear No Evil" and "Dune". I found "The Screwtape Letters" and "Mere Christianity". I found "The Teachings of Don Juan". I found a treasure chest of sophisticated ideas for me to play with.

That really describes the way my mind works quite well; where others see Truths, I see bright shiny playthings. Perhaps even forbidden playthings.

Eventually, I'm sure my parents noticed that I was getting into those books. For a few years we were sharing books between the three of us. I remember really enjoying reading "The Dancing Wu Li Masters" about the same time my mother did. We didn't discuss much; I was pretty much left to come up with my own conclusions.

Near my sixteenth birthday, my mom gave me a copy of the Illuminatus trilogy. She remembered reading it long ago, and thought it was something I would like. She was right. After I finished it, I encouraged her to reread it. Her only comment was "I don't remember that much sex and drugs."